Underestimating SAT timing

October 19, 2006 at 6:04 pm 1 comment

Posted by Dee

Sure, the College Board tells you that the SAT is only 3 hours and 45 minutes long. It starts at 8 a.m. on a Saturday morning and will be done by 11:45 a.m.

Do not believe this!

By the time everyone actually shows up, gets checked in, and gets the test distributed, it’s rarely before 8:30 or 8:45 a.m. Then, after multiple breaks throughout the test, plus time spent after the test collecting the exams before everyone can leave, students almost never get out before 12 p.m. Then, add on extra time for dealing with traffic at your testing facility after the event and you’re probably looking at finishing your supposedly “3 hour and 45 minute test” by 12:30 or 1 p.m.

The reason I stress it’s important not to underestimate the timing of the SAT is because you don’t want to plan subsequent activities too close to the time you’re supposed to finish the SAT. The first time I took the SAT, I was supposed to go to a piano lesson at 12:30… but, since I didn’t get out of the SAT until 1 p.m., not only did I miss the class, but I was also stressing out through the last portion of the exam about how stupid I was for arranging the class so close to the supposed end of the exam.

So, moral is, don’t underestimate SAT timing, folks, otherwise you’ll end up stressed out and cranky.

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Entry filed under: College Board, Extracurricular activities, Organization, Piano, Practice test, SAT, Testing, Timing, Tips/Tricks.

Myth of the 200 points How “x” does academics: x = Berkeley

1 Comment Add your own

  • 1. Sam Jackson  |  October 19, 2006 at 6:54 pm

    Equally important is for when you are pacing your patience for the test. Sadly, so much of it is your endurance, as far as attention is concerned. And if you are only expecting the 3 45, you’re going to be in for a nasty surprise after 3 hours and 45 minutes have gone by and you have god knows how many sections left over, sprawled out seemingly endlessly before you.

    Reply

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